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Newnan Coweta Humane Society


Visit Newnan Coweta Humane Society >> http://www.nchsrescue.org   (report broken link)
5
Adoptable Pets in Georgia
Newnan-Coweta Humane Society is a 501(c)3 all volunteer, non-profit organization. Through rescue, foster programs and community awareness, our goal is to one day eliminate the euthanization of healthy, adoptable animals in our area.

Our Mission Statement: To provide leadership in the implementation of public policy concerning animal issues, and to participate in the humane management of the area’s increasing animal population. We will also provide educational programs to assist residents in caring for and enjoying their pets and will work to improve public awareness of companion animals’ ability to enhance the quality of life in our community.


Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 785
Newnan, GA 30264

Phone: 770-253-4694

Do you need to find a loving home for your pet?

No-kill shelters do wonderful work, but as a result, are often inundated with pet surrenders. In the unfortunate scenario that you have to find a new home for your pet, please read through the rehoming solution and articles on this page before contacting the shelter.

Feral Cat TNR Program
0
High-Volume, Low-Cost Spay/Neuter
5
Rescue Groups
0
Foster Care
5
Comprehensive Adoption Programs
0
Pet Retention
0
Medical and Behavior Programs
0
Public Relations/Community Involvement
0
Volunteers
5
Proactive Redemptions
0
A Compassionate Director
0
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1. Feral Cat TNR Program

Many communities are embracing Trap, Neuter, Release programs (TNR) to improve animal welfare, reduce death rates, and meet obligations to public welfare.


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2. High-Volume, Low-Cost Spay/Neuter

Low cost, high volume spay/neuter will quickly lead to fewer animals entering the shelter system, allowing more resources to be allocated toward saving lives.


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3. Rescue Groups

An adoption or transfer to a rescue group frees up scarce cage and kennel space, reduces expenses for feeding, cleaning, killing, and improves a community's rate of lifesaving. In an environment of millions of dogs and cats killed in shelters annually, rare is the circumstance in which a rescue group should be denied an animal.


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4. Foster Care

Volunteer foster care is crucial to No Kill. Without it, saving lives is compromised. It is a low cost, and often no cost, way of increasing a shelter's capacity, improving public relations, increasing a shelter's public image, rehabilitating sick and injured or behaviorally challenged animals, and saving lives.


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5. Comprehensive Adoption Programs

Adoptions are vital to an agency's lifesaving mission. The quantity and quality of shelter adoptions is in shelter management's hands, making lifesaving a direct function of shelter policies and practice. In fact, studies show people get their animals from shelters only 20% of the time. If shelters better promoted their animals and had adoption programs responsive to the needs of the community, including public access hours for working people, offsite adoptions, adoption incentives, and effective marketing, they could increase the number of homes available and replace killing with adoptions. Contrary to conventional wisdom, shelters can adopt their way out of killing.


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6. Pet Retention

While some of the reasons animals are surrendered to shelters are unavoidable, others can be prevented-but only if shelters are willing to work with people to help them solve their problems. Saving animals requires communities to develop innovative strategies for keeping people and their companion animals together. And the more a community sees its shelters as a place to turn for advice and assistance, the easier this job will be.


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7. Medical and Behavior Programs

In order to meet its commitment to a lifesaving guarantee for all savable animals, shelters need to keep animals happy and healthy and keep animals moving through the system. To do this, shelters must put in place comprehensive vaccination, handling, cleaning, socialization, and care policies before animals get sick and rehabilitative efforts for those who come in sick, injured, unweaned, or traumatized.


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8. Public Relations/Community Involvement

Increasing adoptions, maximizing donations, recruiting volunteers and partnering with community agencies comes down to one thing: increasing the shelter's exposure. And that means consistent marketing and public relations. Public relations and marketing are the foundation of all a shelter's activities and their success. To do all these things well, the shelter must be in the public eye.


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9. Volunteers

Volunteers are a dedicated "army of compassion" and the backbone of a successful No Kill effort. There is never enough staff, never enough dollars to hire more staff, and always more needs than paid human resources. That is where volunteers come in and make the difference between success and failure and, for the animals, life and death.


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10. Proactive Redemptions

One of the most overlooked areas for reducing killing in animal control shelters are lost animal reclaims. Sadly, besides having pet owners fill out a lost pet report, very little effort is made in this area of shelter operations. This is unfortunate because doing so-primarily shifting from passive to a more proactive approach-has proven to have a significant impact on lifesaving and allow shelters to return a large percentage of lost animals to their families.


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11. A Compassionate Director

The final element of the No Kill equation is the most important of all, without which all other elements are thwarted-a hard working, compassionate animal control or shelter director not content to regurgitate tired cliches or hide behind the myth of "too many animals, not enough homes." Unfortunately, this one is also oftentimes the hardest one to demand and find.


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hi. my name is lori. i have done fostering for furkids for a few years (eventually adopted most) and i've been doing ferel spay/neuter release in my neighborhood- 14 in the past 3 years. i have 7 inside and 4 that i regularly feed outside. unfortunatly i have too many medical expenses to add another cat to feed outside. im looking for a shelter or anyone to take in a kitten/cat that came to my house a couple days ago. furkids is full right now and animal control will take it but straight up told me it would probably be put to sleep. most outside cats by me are ferrel but this little angel came out of the woods completely tame. definitly not someone's cat now- it belly was so sunken in, totally starving- was probably thrown out when someone moved, ect. the cat is female, approx 5 months old, brown tabby with an orange dot on forhead and orange under chin and orange tinted in the tabby markings. it is very malnurished- been feeding it for 2 days. it is soooo sweet- follows me around yard like a dog, falls asleep on my chest, purrs constantly and loves to sit on lap. it will make someone a great cat. the ferrels i feed outside are attacking it and i definitly can't add it to the ones i feed outside cause they will hurt it and i just cant afford it. if i dont find someone to take it in the next couple days im going to have no choice but to take it to animal control where it will prob be put asleep. i cant have it out there getting attacked and i cant afford to get it fixed or take care of it after. PLEASE, PLEASE can anyone take this cat in and put it up for adoption? i will gladly drive it anywhere no matter how far. i currently do not have a computer or internet on my phone - at library writing this and i only go there once or twice a week so i will need to be contacted by phone. my number is 404-509-0379- call me anytime.
posted by Lori, on 2017-09-07 20:31:13