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PAWS, Progressive Animal Welfare Society (Lynnwood) Reviews


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7
Reviews
1
Comprehensive Adoption Programs 1 average
1 posted by kiki.terp, on 2015-01-04 20:53:48
It seems like these people don't want these animals to be adopted. They found any excuse they could not to let us, and many other people who were there at the same time, adopt someone. The process to even look at the animals is ridiculously long and complicated, and after all of that, most people end up refused. I'm very disappointed. These animals deserve better.
Rescue Groups 1 average
1 posted by kiki.terp, on 2015-01-04 20:52:38
It seems like these people don't want these animals to be adopted. They found any excuse they could not to let us, and many other people who were there at the same time, adopt someone. The process to even look at the animals is ridiculously long and complicated, and after all of that, most people end up refused. I'm very disappointed. These animals deserve better.
1 posted by PeteFabian, on 2013-12-17 20:21:21
THIS PLACE IS A JOKE. Acting like a caring animal loving organization but they are nothing but typical BREED HATERS. Quick to judge and make assumptions about a dog based on their breed. I just got back from driving 65 miles to try and surrender my moms 5 yr old Rottweiler female. She had a bad stroke and will not be coming home again, so the dog needs to find a good home. I bring her into the facility and the woman behind the counter was immediately dismissive of us. She said they are a limited intake facility and I needed to fill out a form which we did. After wasting our time with that she then said let me ask my manager if we can even take her. She left and in less than a minute she returned to say she said no without even looking at her testing her or anything. I really needed help we had no where to take her on such short notice. NOW SHE IS IN THE ANIMAL SHELTER AND WILL MOST LIKELY BE PUT DOWN BECAUSE OF HER BREED. THANKS FOR NOTHING!!!! NO KILL MAYBE BUT MY DOG WAS KILLED EITHER WAY
A Compassionate Director 1 average
1 posted by julia.is.for.julia, on 2014-10-05 21:13:30
DO NOT TAKE ANY SICK OR INJURED ANIMAL TO PAWS! THEY WILL KILL IT! I took a pigeon to PAWS yesterday. They immediately KILLED IT! I called PAWS yesterday morning because I saw a pigeon that appeared wet. One leg appeared deformed (not unusual among birds in downtown Seattle) Its legs had been tangled in some material but it was able to walk normally and flew when I tried to go near it. The bird was clearly trying to get the fibers off and to get away from me. My initial plan was to cut off the light material around its legs. I called PAWS and was told that the bird likely got into cooking oil. I explained that one leg was deformed and the lady stated it may have pox. I asked if they would treat it if it had pox. She said they would "euthanize" it. I immediately searched for pictures of bird pox online and the bird clearly did not have pox. As a precaution, I took 4 pictures of the bird and emailed them to paws. The lady confirmed that the bird did not have pox. She encouraged me to get the bird and take it to the Seattle Animal Shelter before 2 pm saying a PAWS volunteer would pick it up there. She said with the oil on the bird, the bird would not be able to insulate itself, etc. My understanding was that PAWS would wash the bird, take care of it and release it to a park near where I found it. After several unsuccessful attempts to catch the pigeon, with the help of several people, we were able to catch it. It had gone into a fenced area and I had to get the manager of a building to open the gates to let me in. THE MANAGER STATED THAT THERE WERE TWO PIGEONS AND THAT THEY'VE BEEN THERE FOR 4 MONTHS OR MORE. I asked if the pigeon looked like that often, i.e. wet. He said yes. He pointed to the oil bins and said it's because they go there. After he opened the gates, the pigeon left the fenced area and we were unable to catch it. It wasn't until we trapped it behind dumpsters and had several people involved that we got it. ONE LADY WHO CAME FROM A RESTAURANT NEARBY TOLD ME TO TAKE THE BIRD AND FEED IT WORMS. I should have listened to her. She said she had a bird at home. I put the pigeon in a cat carrier and covered it with a blanket and took it on the bus to Lynwood and then took a taxi to PAWS. I could have dropped it off at the Seattle Animal Shelter but I didn't want it to sit at the shelter for several hours before it was picked up by PAWS. Also, I wanted to make sure it would be okay. I should have known not to trust the staff when I arrived at PAWS. After reminding the lady that I'd spoken with her on the phone, she came around from behind the desk and immediately yanked the carrier from my hand forcefully. She said she was taking the bird to the exam room. I tried to tell myself that it was okay and that she just wanted to check the bird out. After a few minutes, she came out and said that she wasn't sure they'd be able to "rehabilitate" the bird. I asked what that meant. She said since it had a deformed foot, they may not release it. I asked if they would keep it there then. I assumed they had facilities where they keep wildlife. She said no. SHE SAID SHE COULD NOT RELEASE THE PIGEON BACK TO ME. She said that the pigeon's feet likely got trapped in nesting material. Also that the other pigeon which was always seen with pigeon was likely a "nesting mate." The lady at PAWS said they see "millions" of pigeons. She said they would not keep a "pigeon" at their facility. The way she put it meant that to PAWS they are disposable. I was shocked. I found out that the pigeon was killed on arrival. I was told yesterday that the doctor would see the pigeon sometime in the afternoon (i.e. hours later). I told the lady at the front office to please talk to the doctor and explain that people have seen the pigeon and a partner for 4 months or more and they have been surviving on their own. I could easily have cut the thin material entangled around the pigeon's feet and it would have flown away. Maybe for the first time in its life, it's leg would not have been entangled. PAWS NEVER GAVE THIS PIGEON A CHANCE AND TOOK IT AWAY FROM ITS PARTNER WHO HAD BEEN WITH IT FOR A LONG TIME. If I had been aware of the other NEGATIVE REVIEWS of PAWS on Google and Yelp (which I only read today), I would never have taken this pigeon to PAWS. If you are a true animal lover, DO NOT TAKE ANY ANIMAL TO PAWS! I won't donate to them either.
Volunteers 1 average
1 posted by julia.is.for.julia, on 2014-10-05 21:13:06
DO NOT TAKE ANY SICK OR INJURED ANIMAL TO PAWS! THEY WILL KILL IT! I took a pigeon to PAWS yesterday. They immediately KILLED IT! I called PAWS yesterday morning because I saw a pigeon that appeared wet. One leg appeared deformed (not unusual among birds in downtown Seattle) Its legs had been tangled in some material but it was able to walk normally and flew when I tried to go near it. The bird was clearly trying to get the fibers off and to get away from me. My initial plan was to cut off the light material around its legs. I called PAWS and was told that the bird likely got into cooking oil. I explained that one leg was deformed and the lady stated it may have pox. I asked if they would treat it if it had pox. She said they would "euthanize" it. I immediately searched for pictures of bird pox online and the bird clearly did not have pox. As a precaution, I took 4 pictures of the bird and emailed them to paws. The lady confirmed that the bird did not have pox. She encouraged me to get the bird and take it to the Seattle Animal Shelter before 2 pm saying a PAWS volunteer would pick it up there. She said with the oil on the bird, the bird would not be able to insulate itself, etc. My understanding was that PAWS would wash the bird, take care of it and release it to a park near where I found it. After several unsuccessful attempts to catch the pigeon, with the help of several people, we were able to catch it. It had gone into a fenced area and I had to get the manager of a building to open the gates to let me in. THE MANAGER STATED THAT THERE WERE TWO PIGEONS AND THAT THEY'VE BEEN THERE FOR 4 MONTHS OR MORE. I asked if the pigeon looked like that often, i.e. wet. He said yes. He pointed to the oil bins and said it's because they go there. After he opened the gates, the pigeon left the fenced area and we were unable to catch it. It wasn't until we trapped it behind dumpsters and had several people involved that we got it. ONE LADY WHO CAME FROM A RESTAURANT NEARBY TOLD ME TO TAKE THE BIRD AND FEED IT WORMS. I should have listened to her. She said she had a bird at home. I put the pigeon in a cat carrier and covered it with a blanket and took it on the bus to Lynwood and then took a taxi to PAWS. I could have dropped it off at the Seattle Animal Shelter but I didn't want it to sit at the shelter for several hours before it was picked up by PAWS. Also, I wanted to make sure it would be okay. I should have known not to trust the staff when I arrived at PAWS. After reminding the lady that I'd spoken with her on the phone, she came around from behind the desk and immediately yanked the carrier from my hand forcefully. She said she was taking the bird to the exam room. I tried to tell myself that it was okay and that she just wanted to check the bird out. After a few minutes, she came out and said that she wasn't sure they'd be able to "rehabilitate" the bird. I asked what that meant. She said since it had a deformed foot, they may not release it. I asked if they would keep it there then. I assumed they had facilities where they keep wildlife. She said no. SHE SAID SHE COULD NOT RELEASE THE PIGEON BACK TO ME. She said that the pigeon's feet likely got trapped in nesting material. Also that the other pigeon which was always seen with pigeon was likely a "nesting mate." The lady at PAWS said they see "millions" of pigeons. She said they would not keep a "pigeon" at their facility. The way she put it meant that to PAWS they are disposable. I was shocked. I found out that the pigeon was killed on arrival. I was told yesterday that the doctor would see the pigeon sometime in the afternoon (i.e. hours later). I told the lady at the front office to please talk to the doctor and explain that people have seen the pigeon and a partner for 4 months or more and they have been surviving on their own. I could easily have cut the thin material entangled around the pigeon's feet and it would have flown away. Maybe for the first time in its life, it's leg would not have been entangled. PAWS NEVER GAVE THIS PIGEON A CHANCE AND TOOK IT AWAY FROM ITS PARTNER WHO HAD BEEN WITH IT FOR A LONG TIME. If I had been aware of the other NEGATIVE REVIEWS of PAWS on Google and Yelp (which I only read today), I would never have taken this pigeon to PAWS. If you are a true animal lover, DO NOT TAKE ANY ANIMAL TO PAWS! I won't donate to them either.
Medical and Behavior Programs 1 average
1 posted by julia.is.for.julia, on 2014-10-05 21:12:19
DO NOT TAKE ANY SICK OR INJURED ANIMAL TO PAWS! THEY WILL KILL IT! I took a pigeon to PAWS yesterday. They immediately KILLED IT! I called PAWS yesterday morning because I saw a pigeon that appeared wet. One leg appeared deformed (not unusual among birds in downtown Seattle) Its legs had been tangled in some material but it was able to walk normally and flew when I tried to go near it. The bird was clearly trying to get the fibers off and to get away from me. My initial plan was to cut off the light material around its legs. I called PAWS and was told that the bird likely got into cooking oil. I explained that one leg was deformed and the lady stated it may have pox. I asked if they would treat it if it had pox. She said they would "euthanize" it. I immediately searched for pictures of bird pox online and the bird clearly did not have pox. As a precaution, I took 4 pictures of the bird and emailed them to paws. The lady confirmed that the bird did not have pox. She encouraged me to get the bird and take it to the Seattle Animal Shelter before 2 pm saying a PAWS volunteer would pick it up there. She said with the oil on the bird, the bird would not be able to insulate itself, etc. My understanding was that PAWS would wash the bird, take care of it and release it to a park near where I found it. After several unsuccessful attempts to catch the pigeon, with the help of several people, we were able to catch it. It had gone into a fenced area and I had to get the manager of a building to open the gates to let me in. THE MANAGER STATED THAT THERE WERE TWO PIGEONS AND THAT THEY'VE BEEN THERE FOR 4 MONTHS OR MORE. I asked if the pigeon looked like that often, i.e. wet. He said yes. He pointed to the oil bins and said it's because they go there. After he opened the gates, the pigeon left the fenced area and we were unable to catch it. It wasn't until we trapped it behind dumpsters and had several people involved that we got it. ONE LADY WHO CAME FROM A RESTAURANT NEARBY TOLD ME TO TAKE THE BIRD AND FEED IT WORMS. I should have listened to her. She said she had a bird at home. I put the pigeon in a cat carrier and covered it with a blanket and took it on the bus to Lynwood and then took a taxi to PAWS. I could have dropped it off at the Seattle Animal Shelter but I didn't want it to sit at the shelter for several hours before it was picked up by PAWS. Also, I wanted to make sure it would be okay. I should have known not to trust the staff when I arrived at PAWS. After reminding the lady that I'd spoken with her on the phone, she came around from behind the desk and immediately yanked the carrier from my hand forcefully. She said she was taking the bird to the exam room. I tried to tell myself that it was okay and that she just wanted to check the bird out. After a few minutes, she came out and said that she wasn't sure they'd be able to "rehabilitate" the bird. I asked what that meant. She said since it had a deformed foot, they may not release it. I asked if they would keep it there then. I assumed they had facilities where they keep wildlife. She said no. SHE SAID SHE COULD NOT RELEASE THE PIGEON BACK TO ME. She said that the pigeon's feet likely got trapped in nesting material. Also that the other pigeon which was always seen with pigeon was likely a "nesting mate." The lady at PAWS said they see "millions" of pigeons. She said they would not keep a "pigeon" at their facility. The way she put it meant that to PAWS they are disposable. I was shocked. I found out that the pigeon was killed on arrival. I was told yesterday that the doctor would see the pigeon sometime in the afternoon (i.e. hours later). I told the lady at the front office to please talk to the doctor and explain that people have seen the pigeon and a partner for 4 months or more and they have been surviving on their own. I could easily have cut the thin material entangled around the pigeon's feet and it would have flown away. Maybe for the first time in its life, it's leg would not have been entangled. PAWS NEVER GAVE THIS PIGEON A CHANCE AND TOOK IT AWAY FROM ITS PARTNER WHO HAD BEEN WITH IT FOR A LONG TIME. If I had been aware of the other NEGATIVE REVIEWS of PAWS on Google and Yelp (which I only read today), I would never have taken this pigeon to PAWS. If you are a true animal lover, DO NOT TAKE ANY ANIMAL TO PAWS! I won't donate to them either.
Feral Cat TNR Program 1 average
1 posted by PeteFabian, on 2013-12-17 20:20:34
(no comment)
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1. Feral Cat TNR Program

Many communities are embracing Trap, Neuter, Release programs (TNR) to improve animal welfare, reduce death rates, and meet obligations to public welfare.


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2. High-Volume, Low-Cost Spay/Neuter

Low cost, high volume spay/neuter will quickly lead to fewer animals entering the shelter system, allowing more resources to be allocated toward saving lives.


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3. Rescue Groups

An adoption or transfer to a rescue group frees up scarce cage and kennel space, reduces expenses for feeding, cleaning, killing, and improves a community's rate of lifesaving. In an environment of millions of dogs and cats killed in shelters annually, rare is the circumstance in which a rescue group should be denied an animal.


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4. Foster Care

Volunteer foster care is crucial to No Kill. Without it, saving lives is compromised. It is a low cost, and often no cost, way of increasing a shelter's capacity, improving public relations, increasing a shelter's public image, rehabilitating sick and injured or behaviorally challenged animals, and saving lives.


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5. Comprehensive Adoption Programs

Adoptions are vital to an agency's lifesaving mission. The quantity and quality of shelter adoptions is in shelter management's hands, making lifesaving a direct function of shelter policies and practice. In fact, studies show people get their animals from shelters only 20% of the time. If shelters better promoted their animals and had adoption programs responsive to the needs of the community, including public access hours for working people, offsite adoptions, adoption incentives, and effective marketing, they could increase the number of homes available and replace killing with adoptions. Contrary to conventional wisdom, shelters can adopt their way out of killing.


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6. Pet Retention

While some of the reasons animals are surrendered to shelters are unavoidable, others can be prevented-but only if shelters are willing to work with people to help them solve their problems. Saving animals requires communities to develop innovative strategies for keeping people and their companion animals together. And the more a community sees its shelters as a place to turn for advice and assistance, the easier this job will be.


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7. Medical and Behavior Programs

In order to meet its commitment to a lifesaving guarantee for all savable animals, shelters need to keep animals happy and healthy and keep animals moving through the system. To do this, shelters must put in place comprehensive vaccination, handling, cleaning, socialization, and care policies before animals get sick and rehabilitative efforts for those who come in sick, injured, unweaned, or traumatized.


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8. Public Relations/Community Involvement

Increasing adoptions, maximizing donations, recruiting volunteers and partnering with community agencies comes down to one thing: increasing the shelter's exposure. And that means consistent marketing and public relations. Public relations and marketing are the foundation of all a shelter's activities and their success. To do all these things well, the shelter must be in the public eye.


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9. Volunteers

Volunteers are a dedicated "army of compassion" and the backbone of a successful No Kill effort. There is never enough staff, never enough dollars to hire more staff, and always more needs than paid human resources. That is where volunteers come in and make the difference between success and failure and, for the animals, life and death.


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10. Proactive Redemptions

One of the most overlooked areas for reducing killing in animal control shelters are lost animal reclaims. Sadly, besides having pet owners fill out a lost pet report, very little effort is made in this area of shelter operations. This is unfortunate because doing so-primarily shifting from passive to a more proactive approach-has proven to have a significant impact on lifesaving and allow shelters to return a large percentage of lost animals to their families.


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11. A Compassionate Director

The final element of the No Kill equation is the most important of all, without which all other elements are thwarted-a hard working, compassionate animal control or shelter director not content to regurgitate tired cliches or hide behind the myth of "too many animals, not enough homes." Unfortunately, this one is also oftentimes the hardest one to demand and find.


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