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Marion County Humane Society and Rescue (Fairmont) Reviews


<Visit Marion County Humane Society and Rescue (Fairmont)
22
Reviews
3.5
Adoptable Pets in West Virginia
A Compassionate Director 3.5 average
5 posted by SuzeDempsey, on 2017-02-01 21:43:13
Our director is a licensed Veterinarian Technician who has dedicated her life to animal welfare. We are so fortunate to have this expertise at our disposal and a role model for our compassionate staff. We often say "we can't change their past, but we can reshape their future."
2 posted by BobbiPritt, on 2014-11-19 19:26:38
On two different occasions I have called the Humane Society to get an animal rescued and have been ignored both times. I am a HUGE Animal lover . I have 2 Dogs and A Cat that needs Neutered. However, my neighborhood seems to be a drop off point for cats, due to being across the street from Farmont Vet Hospital. But instead they end up running around tearing out the garbage. I try to give them something to eat but I can't afford it.I called today for help and was told I would get a call back, Which I did not get. I am trying to save a mama and her one baby she has left. Please help this area with this problem. There are 2 Beautiful Black cats,maybe close to a year old and mama with her baby.A friend took one baby to the vets because it's eyes were completely matted shut and breathing bad. I don't want these cats to get hit or get sick. They need HELP. Thank You for your time. Bobbi Pritt
Proactive Redemptions 3.5 average
5 posted by SuzeDempsey, on 2017-02-01 21:39:29
We encourage pet owners to post on our FB page. We request a picture to post at our shelter. We have a daily posting in our local newspaper as to where to post the lost pet.
2 posted by BobbiPritt, on 2014-11-19 19:17:18
(no comment)
Volunteers 3.5 average
5 posted by SuzeDempsey, on 2017-02-01 21:35:52
Our community is highly active in all our fundraisers as well as financial support from many business agencies. The PAWS group (Pets Are Worth Saving) at our local WV University supports us in many fundraisers. We are fortunate to be associated with such a wonderful group of young volunteers.
2 posted by BobbiPritt, on 2014-11-19 19:16:51
(no comment)
Public Relations/Community Involvement 3 average
4 posted by SuzeDempsey, on 2017-02-01 21:34:52
We have a Marketing Committee that oversees this function. We have weekly radio spots promoting our pets and upcoming fundraisers. We have monthly pet adoptions off site and fundraisers every month. During these events literature is available regarding responsible pet ownership as well as personnel available to field questions and concerns.
2 posted by BobbiPritt, on 2014-11-19 19:16:43
(no comment)
Medical and Behavior Programs 3.5 average
5 posted by SuzeDempsey, on 2017-02-01 21:29:24
Our shelter manager is a licensed Veterinarian Technician. Our VP is in charge of the Veterinarian Program at our local Community & Technical College. Intake protocols were written by both parties and reviewed with all staff members. We have an intake policy and a quarantine period before new arrivals are transferred into the general shelter area. Our staff documents and reports any concerns to the Shelter Manager. Veterinarian students under the supervision and guidance of the Pierpont Community & Technical College Veterinarian, Lab Manager, and Program Coordinator, the Veterinary Technician works under a licensed veterinarian in assisting with animal health care. All animals are up to date on shots before leaving the shelter. We also require other animals at the home to be up to date on shots before adopting. Documentation required. Adopters Vet references are also checked.
2 posted by BobbiPritt, on 2014-11-19 19:16:38
(no comment)
Pet Retention 3.5 average
5 posted by SuzeDempsey, on 2017-02-01 21:19:14
IF for any reason we cannot take an animal, we refer the surrenderer to other no-kill pet rescues nearby or ask them to check back as space becomes available. We are working on a "food bank" program to help low income with their pets. Our animals stay with us until fosters, permanent homes/families or rescues are found.
2 posted by BobbiPritt, on 2014-11-19 19:16:34
(no comment)
Comprehensive Adoption Programs 4 average
5 posted by SuzeDempsey, on 2017-02-01 21:12:34
After reorganization, new policies/procedures have proven to be highly successful in regard to adoptions. Adoptions are at an all time high. Our intake policies and screening process ensures our pets are going to good homes. Our Shelter Manager is a certified Veterinarian Technician. We participate in off site adoption events monthly. this gives us an opportunity to interact with the public, promote responsible pet ownership and also with our county school system to talk with the younger generation regarding pet ownership. All our critters are on Petfinder.com as well as our own website AND Facebook. We are open daily AND by appointment.
3 posted by BobbiPritt, on 2014-11-19 19:16:14
(no comment)
Foster Care 4 average
5 posted by SuzeDempsey, on 2017-02-01 20:55:24
We have a wonderful volunteer dedicated to this program who has a room dedicated for this purpose in the home. The foster program is highly successful as our foster families are many. We are also writing grants to further educate potential fosters on animal well being while in their care. All medical, food and vaccinations are paid for by the Marion County Humane Society while in foster care which has increased foster family participation. We secured a grant for $5,000 in 2016 to enhance the foster program. Our staff is also part of the foster program. Bottle babies are their specialty !
3 posted by BobbiPritt, on 2014-11-19 19:16:08
(no comment)
Rescue Groups 3.5 average
4 posted by SuzeDempsey, on 2017-02-01 20:51:47
We reorganized in 2015-16 and intend to kick-start the rescue program to new heights. We have a working relationship with our local Animal Control. We pull animals from that facility often. Last year was a record number of dogs pulled from Animal Control AND owner surrenders. Our priority is to take owner surrenders from within our county. Last year we rescued more than the previous year and intend to improve and maintain this program in 2017. We make rescues out of state and intend to do more as volunteers become available, however, our adoption rates allow us to bring in several abandoned pets from our own county.
3 posted by BobbiPritt, on 2014-11-19 19:16:03
(no comment)
High-Volume, Low-Cost Spay/Neuter 4 average
5 posted by SuzeDempsey, on 2017-02-01 20:44:16
We offer vouchers to the general public to encourage spay/neuter. We also secured a $10,000 grant in 2016 for free spay/neuter to low-income residents in five surrounding counties. In 2017, we received a $20,000 grant for free spay/neuter to low-income residents in five surrounding counties. All of our critters are spayed or neutered before they are adopted. If too young, a voucher for spay/neuter is given to the adopter. Follow up calls confirm pet has been spayed/neutered. We are writing grants to increase the dollar amount offered to the general public.
3 posted by BobbiPritt, on 2014-11-19 19:15:33
(no comment)
Feral Cat TNR Program 2 average
3 posted by SuzeDempsey, on 2017-02-01 20:41:11
We are partnering with an adjoining county (already established) organization to combine efforts which will double our chances of success. We are securing grants to help fund this program.
1 posted by BobbiPritt, on 2014-11-19 19:15:07
If this county has this program I have never heard about it.
Adoptable Pets in West Virginia
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1. Feral Cat TNR Program

Many communities are embracing Trap, Neuter, Release programs (TNR) to improve animal welfare, reduce death rates, and meet obligations to public welfare.


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2. High-Volume, Low-Cost Spay/Neuter

Low cost, high volume spay/neuter will quickly lead to fewer animals entering the shelter system, allowing more resources to be allocated toward saving lives.


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3. Rescue Groups

An adoption or transfer to a rescue group frees up scarce cage and kennel space, reduces expenses for feeding, cleaning, killing, and improves a community's rate of lifesaving. In an environment of millions of dogs and cats killed in shelters annually, rare is the circumstance in which a rescue group should be denied an animal.


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4. Foster Care

Volunteer foster care is crucial to No Kill. Without it, saving lives is compromised. It is a low cost, and often no cost, way of increasing a shelter's capacity, improving public relations, increasing a shelter's public image, rehabilitating sick and injured or behaviorally challenged animals, and saving lives.


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5. Comprehensive Adoption Programs

Adoptions are vital to an agency's lifesaving mission. The quantity and quality of shelter adoptions is in shelter management's hands, making lifesaving a direct function of shelter policies and practice. In fact, studies show people get their animals from shelters only 20% of the time. If shelters better promoted their animals and had adoption programs responsive to the needs of the community, including public access hours for working people, offsite adoptions, adoption incentives, and effective marketing, they could increase the number of homes available and replace killing with adoptions. Contrary to conventional wisdom, shelters can adopt their way out of killing.


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6. Pet Retention

While some of the reasons animals are surrendered to shelters are unavoidable, others can be prevented-but only if shelters are willing to work with people to help them solve their problems. Saving animals requires communities to develop innovative strategies for keeping people and their companion animals together. And the more a community sees its shelters as a place to turn for advice and assistance, the easier this job will be.


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7. Medical and Behavior Programs

In order to meet its commitment to a lifesaving guarantee for all savable animals, shelters need to keep animals happy and healthy and keep animals moving through the system. To do this, shelters must put in place comprehensive vaccination, handling, cleaning, socialization, and care policies before animals get sick and rehabilitative efforts for those who come in sick, injured, unweaned, or traumatized.


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8. Public Relations/Community Involvement

Increasing adoptions, maximizing donations, recruiting volunteers and partnering with community agencies comes down to one thing: increasing the shelter's exposure. And that means consistent marketing and public relations. Public relations and marketing are the foundation of all a shelter's activities and their success. To do all these things well, the shelter must be in the public eye.


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9. Volunteers

Volunteers are a dedicated "army of compassion" and the backbone of a successful No Kill effort. There is never enough staff, never enough dollars to hire more staff, and always more needs than paid human resources. That is where volunteers come in and make the difference between success and failure and, for the animals, life and death.


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10. Proactive Redemptions

One of the most overlooked areas for reducing killing in animal control shelters are lost animal reclaims. Sadly, besides having pet owners fill out a lost pet report, very little effort is made in this area of shelter operations. This is unfortunate because doing so-primarily shifting from passive to a more proactive approach-has proven to have a significant impact on lifesaving and allow shelters to return a large percentage of lost animals to their families.


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11. A Compassionate Director

The final element of the No Kill equation is the most important of all, without which all other elements are thwarted-a hard working, compassionate animal control or shelter director not content to regurgitate tired cliches or hide behind the myth of "too many animals, not enough homes." Unfortunately, this one is also oftentimes the hardest one to demand and find.


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