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F.L.O.C.K. For the Love of Cats and Kittens (Las Vegas)


Visit F.L.O.C.K. For the Love of Cats and Kittens (Las Vegas) >> https://www.animalshelter.org/shelters/FLOCK_-_For_Love_Of_Cats__Kittens_rId2904_rS_pC.html   (report broken link)
5
Adoptable Pets in Nevada
F.L.O.C.K. is a non-profit, no-kill, volunteer-based cat rescue organization dedicated to saving the unwanted and abandoned cats and kittens throughout the Las Vegas Valley. Our dedicated volunteers devote countless hours to rescuing, feeding, doing TNR (Trap, Neuter and Return), providing medical care, fostering, transporting, fundraising, adoptions, answering the F.L.O.C.K. phone line set up for concerned individuals with cat-related problems, office work, and the numerous other tasks necessary to continuing our mission.

As for the cats, the ones that are adoptable are medically checked out, spayed or neutered, given all shots and placed in excellent foster homes until they can be adopted out to a loving family. Feral cats, who are usually not adoptable, are part of our TNR Program. Their ears are tipped to indicate they have been spayed or neutered. They receive all shots and are given any veterinary care needed before being returned to their colony caretakers who nurture them and make sure they are getting everything they need to live out their lives happily and healthy.


Address:
1930 Village Center Circle, #3-704
Las Vegas NV 89134.
Feral Cat TNR Program
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High-Volume, Low-Cost Spay/Neuter
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Rescue Groups
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Foster Care
0
Comprehensive Adoption Programs
0
Pet Retention
0
Medical and Behavior Programs
0
Public Relations/Community Involvement
0
Volunteers
0
Proactive Redemptions
0
A Compassionate Director
0
Adoptable Pets in Nevada
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1. Feral Cat TNR Program

Many communities are embracing Trap, Neuter, Release programs (TNR) to improve animal welfare, reduce death rates, and meet obligations to public welfare.


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2. High-Volume, Low-Cost Spay/Neuter

Low cost, high volume spay/neuter will quickly lead to fewer animals entering the shelter system, allowing more resources to be allocated toward saving lives.


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3. Rescue Groups

An adoption or transfer to a rescue group frees up scarce cage and kennel space, reduces expenses for feeding, cleaning, killing, and improves a community's rate of lifesaving. In an environment of millions of dogs and cats killed in shelters annually, rare is the circumstance in which a rescue group should be denied an animal.


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4. Foster Care

Volunteer foster care is crucial to No Kill. Without it, saving lives is compromised. It is a low cost, and often no cost, way of increasing a shelter's capacity, improving public relations, increasing a shelter's public image, rehabilitating sick and injured or behaviorally challenged animals, and saving lives.


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5. Comprehensive Adoption Programs

Adoptions are vital to an agency's lifesaving mission. The quantity and quality of shelter adoptions is in shelter management's hands, making lifesaving a direct function of shelter policies and practice. In fact, studies show people get their animals from shelters only 20% of the time. If shelters better promoted their animals and had adoption programs responsive to the needs of the community, including public access hours for working people, offsite adoptions, adoption incentives, and effective marketing, they could increase the number of homes available and replace killing with adoptions. Contrary to conventional wisdom, shelters can adopt their way out of killing.


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6. Pet Retention

While some of the reasons animals are surrendered to shelters are unavoidable, others can be prevented-but only if shelters are willing to work with people to help them solve their problems. Saving animals requires communities to develop innovative strategies for keeping people and their companion animals together. And the more a community sees its shelters as a place to turn for advice and assistance, the easier this job will be.


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7. Medical and Behavior Programs

In order to meet its commitment to a lifesaving guarantee for all savable animals, shelters need to keep animals happy and healthy and keep animals moving through the system. To do this, shelters must put in place comprehensive vaccination, handling, cleaning, socialization, and care policies before animals get sick and rehabilitative efforts for those who come in sick, injured, unweaned, or traumatized.


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8. Public Relations/Community Involvement

Increasing adoptions, maximizing donations, recruiting volunteers and partnering with community agencies comes down to one thing: increasing the shelter's exposure. And that means consistent marketing and public relations. Public relations and marketing are the foundation of all a shelter's activities and their success. To do all these things well, the shelter must be in the public eye.


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9. Volunteers

Volunteers are a dedicated "army of compassion" and the backbone of a successful No Kill effort. There is never enough staff, never enough dollars to hire more staff, and always more needs than paid human resources. That is where volunteers come in and make the difference between success and failure and, for the animals, life and death.


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10. Proactive Redemptions

One of the most overlooked areas for reducing killing in animal control shelters are lost animal reclaims. Sadly, besides having pet owners fill out a lost pet report, very little effort is made in this area of shelter operations. This is unfortunate because doing so-primarily shifting from passive to a more proactive approach-has proven to have a significant impact on lifesaving and allow shelters to return a large percentage of lost animals to their families.


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11. A Compassionate Director

The final element of the No Kill equation is the most important of all, without which all other elements are thwarted-a hard working, compassionate animal control or shelter director not content to regurgitate tired cliches or hide behind the myth of "too many animals, not enough homes." Unfortunately, this one is also oftentimes the hardest one to demand and find.


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Hi, I'm not looking to surrender or rehome my cats, I'm looking for a foster home to care for them for a few months while we wait for their titer's test to be completed so that I may bring them with me. I am moving out of state and would like to bring them with me, however, my new job requires that I start asap, that means having to leave my cats behind while I prepare them. The state I'm moving to requires them to be quarantined but I'm trying to avoid doing that so I'm taking necessary steps in order for them to not be quarantined for 4 months there. I would love if someone can take them in for about 4-5 months. I can provide food and litter allowance. They are silver tabby cats, about 4 years old. They're sisters, bonded from the same litter, one is 9 lbs the other is 13 lbs, very sweet girls never attack anyone or each other. may be a little wary of other animals at first, but usually can live harmoniously with them. If someone is able to watch them for me I'd greatly appreciate it.
posted by jma076, on 2018-06-02 02:28:21
reply
I have a 12 yr old cat that looks Persian longer haired, blue eyed, that I can no longer keep. She will get along with a small dog that is used to cats and another cat if need be but does not like big dogs. She is an indoor cat that loves to go outside. She goes out our doggie door now but when I did not have one she would request to go in and out through the patio. She is an affectionate cat and usually sleeps in my room. I will help out in any way to make sure that the situation works, and I just want to find a good home for her. Please contact me if you are able to consider adopting her.
posted by (empty name), on 2018-05-02 19:54:52
reply
I have a 19 month old cat named Nugget. I am desperately looking to help me foster him for a couple of months or to go to an absolutely wonderful home. Please please please help me. I am unable to keep him in my current living situation due to a large dog who isn't fond of cats. Please help me out, Nugget is my whole world.
posted by alexandramaikekai, on 2018-04-28 18:47:56
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I have a 3 or 4 year old black, shorthair cat named Nemo that I have to rehome. I am moving out of state to a community that does not accept pets. I have had him since he was a kitten. He has been raised with 2 dogs. He is an indoor cat. I am planning to move in 3 weeks. Please help me.
posted by LucySalkoff, on 2018-04-26 17:18:57
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Hi my grandma is 95 years old and cant take care of her cat anymore. Bubbles is about 6 years old and has an extra toe on each paw. She is very loving. I cant take her because my dogs don't do well with cats. If interested please call me at 702-285-7544. Thank you :-)
posted by tifaniesmith7, on 2018-04-06 16:58:59
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Hey I found 3 very fragile abandoned kittens that needs help. Mother has been gone for 2 days. I brought them indoors. There in a blanket with heating pad underneath. NEED HELP
posted by borden09, on 2018-03-19 01:14:53
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I need help. I have been feeding a feral cat I call Smoky. He comes by to eat every two or three days. He is a very large cat. The last time he came by he was moving slow and limping REAL BAD. He ate a bit then left. He needs help but I do not know what to do.
posted by CarleneMcKillop, on 2017-12-26 15:11:20
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My friend has a Maine Coon cat named Pretty that he is trying to rehome. The cat grew up with other cats and small dogs, so he is very social and affecionate. He is declawed, neutered and super cool. He is 13 years old, but still very athletic. AND he has extra toe on each front paw! 702-622-2689
posted by ArmandoLopez, on 2017-12-02 17:54:21
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A feral cat had her kittens in our garage. There are 4or 5 kittens. They are approximately 5 weeks old. How do we get them to the shelter?
posted by RobertDuplisea, on 2017-11-05 06:37:39
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A friend of mine passed away on Tues. I promised him that if anything happened to him I would find "Big Boy" a home. He is a really nice cat but he has diabetes. I would keep him myself except I already have two dogs and six cats. If you can find it in your heart to help me find him a home or a sanctuary that will take him I willbe forever in your debt. Moira in Las Vegas 702 622 5109
posted by MoiraPrice, on 2017-09-14 19:56:19
reply
I have three cats that I have been feeding. Two are ferral and have been trapped neutered and returned. The older male has lived on my front porch for at least 8yrs, the smaller one has been with me for about 5yrs and has a gimpy hind leg. The third actually was abandoned because he had a collar wrapped around his leg, and has been coming around for 3yrs. I am moving to Colorado and though I think the younger ones probably get feed by other people the old grey one stays on the porch. I am more worried about him, what do you suggest? Is there a group that can take my old guy? He actually lets me brush him and cut the mats out of his coat.
posted by cynthialane05, on 2017-08-03 01:19:11
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I have an 11 year old female. She is having mental problems. I can't keep her as she bites, growls and swipes her paw. I don't want her to hurt my granddaughters. She's already scratched my husband and me. Please let me know what I can do.
posted by LenoreAllen, on 2017-08-01 21:58:31
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We have a young boy who is in need of being rehomed. We're moving soon and can't take him with us. He's already neutered. Can you help?
posted by IRLIkariShinji, on 2017-08-01 04:06:13
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My name is Laura. I need help. I have 3neutered boys in need of being rehomed. Can you help me? They were dropped off and I don't think the owner will be coming back. He's a homeless man.The boys are sweet tempered. One needs medical attention, one needs a groomer, and the last seems to be the healthiest.
posted by LauraCreighton, on 2017-08-01 02:37:14
reply
I need to re home one of my cats. Can you help?
posted by MichelleBaldwin, on 2017-06-27 12:11:46